Vision-R

Ask me anything   Suggest a song   Le creative outlet

toptumbles:

Funky traffic cop doing it right

(Source: toptumbles.com, via fuckyeahloldemort)

— 1 week ago with 20720 notes

elation-success:

mydogsnokes:

i miss when i was like 12 and it would be the night before a big field trip or something and i couldnt go to sleep because i was so excited. i miss being so into a book that i would stay up past my bed time reading it. everything seems so bland or something idk. i’m only 19 and everything is so tiring. i miss wanting to be awake

this is the realist shit on this website

(via laughcentre)

— 1 week ago with 359815 notes

bootipop:

I got one of those sleeping masks you put over your eyes to keep the light out of your eyes and i was like “haha I wonder what this looks like on” so i took it to the mirror and put it on and then I realized the flaw in my plan

(via fuckyeahloldemort)

— 1 week ago with 96571 notes

partybarackisinthehousetonight:

ya know that kid whos at the arcade and is just watching the demo for a game but they’re pressing the buttons like they’re playing?? well that’s how i’m handling adulthood so far

(via fuckyeahloldemort)

— 1 week ago with 318492 notes

butttom:

drake tryna get up from the chair after nicki leaves

image

(via greeklesbian)

— 1 week ago with 47110 notes

fuckyeahbadriyaahmad:

sixtyy-two:

unholy-aura:

😂😂😂😂😂

LOOOL 👌👌

lol yas

(Source: ya-zlaba)

— 1 week ago with 2399 notes
Anonymous asked: top five most likely things infps do for fun?


Answer:

thestarsinmycupofcoffee:

ooohhh FUN? That’s my middle name (not really I’m a boring teenager who likes glow in the dark dinosaur stickers and poetry). LETS GET THIS LIST DONE!

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1) READ- obviously this had to be in the top five! We infps generally adore reading and we love how books can transport us to magical places, make us fall in love, frustrate us and get us emotionally attached to fictional characters. 

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2) Travel- Most of the things that are fun to us, involve exploration in some way or the other and this? This is the real deal- we dream to travel all around the world- Venice, Paris, Africa, Vienna EVERYWHERE! Travelling as they say, is like reading more pages of the book that is the world and it gives us a sense of freedom which we absolutely love!
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3) Look through old photographs, trinkets and letters- I have something I call a memory box and it contains strange little things that I’m sentimental about- from the teddy bear candle on my first birthday cake, to the leaf I stepped on when I had a good day! Most infps tend to collect all these little things and sort through them because they have an amazing memory and although that means that some unwanted details may be etched too clearly in our minds, these objects take us to moments in our lives we are able to experience again.
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4) Spend time with our loved ones- This might just be being alone with them and not talking or watching a favourite movie together or talking about everything and nothing, but infps are warm, relationship-oriented creatures and although we love being solitary, we also like the company of the few people we allow to be in our hearts!
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5) Daydream- Did you seriously think that I would leave this one out? HAHAHAHA not a chance! We love this and as I repeatedly say, we are dreamers and nothing entertains us more than going through our thoughts, making up creative *coughsweirdasfcough* scenarios and taking wonderful little trips in our imaginations!
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Love,
- Your infp princess

— 1 week ago with 270 notes
arachnomatic:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

There’s a notorious corner (or possibly the doorway before it) where all the art teachers just stop and stare blankly for a while before going on with our day.

arachnomatic:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

There’s a notorious corner (or possibly the doorway before it) where all the art teachers just stop and stare blankly for a while before going on with our day.

(via fathappyhippo)

— 1 week ago with 45582 notes

Just Like A Dream - Lykke Li

(Source: yourdailyaudio, via fuckyeahbadriyaahmad)

— 1 week ago with 39 notes

expl0sive-cucumber:

skinnymini-13:

myresin:

THIS VIDEO

WATCH THIS VIDEO

WORDS CANNOT EXPRESS HOW WELL DONE THIS VIDEO WAS DONE TO SPREAD AWARENESS.

Everyone watch this

I WANT TO BREAK MY MOUSE WITH REBLOG

(Source: youtube.com, via superblys)

— 1 week ago with 210811 notes
ehab-elmasry:

أنَا لُغْز كِبِيرْ .. مِشْ فَهْمُه !!

ehab-elmasry:

أنَا لُغْز كِبِيرْ .. مِشْ فَهْمُه !!

(via 3feef94)

— 1 week ago with 20 notes

reginamas:

i just told my mom i died at birth and i’ve been a ghost this entire time just growing and manifesting into the daughter she’d lost

and she’s just like

well please go to the light because i am tired of your shit

(Source: adorablebadass, via laughcentre)

— 1 week ago with 727612 notes